3. Looking For Triggers

Establishing where and when the behaviour occurs AND DOES NOT OCCUR does a few things:

 

1. It helps us to work out that even though it may feel like the behaviour is happening all the time, it may actually be quite rare (or only occur in a few places).

2. It helps us to begin to understand how the environment impacts on the person’s behaviour.

3. It encourages us to look at what is happening around the person when the behaviour occurs. This may give us clues as to how we can change or reduce the behaviour.

 

When we are looking for triggers, we are trying to work out WHAT HAPPENED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE THE PERSON DISPLAYED THE BEHAVIOUR OF CONCERN. Some useful things to think about to help you to work out what the trigger for the behaviour was could include: -

  • Did the behaviour occur after you asked the person to do something?

  • Did the behaviour occur when the person was alone for a while?

  • Did the behaviour occur when the person had nothing to do?

  • Did the behaviour occur when the person wanted something?

  • Did the behaviour occur when you had said "no" to a request from the person?

  • Did the behaviour occur when you stopped them from doing something that they wanted to do?

  • Did the behaviour occur after you said something to the person?

 

The behaviour frequency and STAR charts in Step 2 resource panel can help in gathering this information.

 

 

Resources

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